by Mantel Featherson

The Five Best Supplements for Maintaining your Energy on the Golf Course

Maintaining optimal energy levels during a round of golf can be cha...
The Five Best Supplements for Maintaining your Energy on the Golf Course

Maintaining optimal energy levels during a round of golf can be challenging, especially given the physical and mental demands of the game. Supplements can play a supportive role in ensuring sustained energy and focus. I've researched the five of the best supplements golfers should consider for maintaining their energy on the course:


1. Caffeine
Caffeine is well-known for its stimulant effects, which can enhance both physical and mental performance. It helps increase alertness and reduce perceived exertion during exercise.

How to use - A moderate dose of caffeine (about 3-6 mg per kilogram of body weight) taken 30-60 minutes before your round can help improve focus and energy.

Note - be mindful of your total daily intake to avoid jitteriness or a crash later on.

Our Birdies Edge Energy Strips are a proven and convenient way to get the caffeine you need to boost your energy on the course. 


2. Branched-Chain Amino Acids (BCAAs)
BCAAs (leucine, isoleucine, and valine) are essential amino acids that help reduce muscle fatigue, enhance muscle recovery, and support endurance.

How to use -  Taking 5-10 grams of BCAAs before or during your round can help reduce muscle soreness and fatigue. Studies have shown that BCAAs can decrease exercise-induced muscle damage and promote recovery.

Our Fairway Edge BCAA powder is a proven way to get the Amino Acids you need to boost your energy on the course. 



3. Electrolytes
Electrolytes (sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium) are crucial for maintaining hydration, muscle function, and energy levels. Dehydration and electrolyte imbalances can lead to fatigue and decreased performance.

How to use -  Use electrolyte supplements or sports drinks during your round to replenish lost minerals. Look for products that provide a balanced mix of electrolytes without excessive sugar.

Our Aces Edge Nitric Shock powder is a proven way to get the electrolytes you need to boost your energy on the course. 



4. Creatine
Creatine is a popular supplement known for its ability to enhance muscle strength and power. It also helps in maintaining energy levels during high-intensity activities.

How to use - A daily dose of 3-5 grams of creatine monohydrate can help improve your overall strength and endurance. Consistent use is key, as creatine takes time to build up in the muscles.

Our Power Edge Creatine Monohydrate Powder is a proven way to boost your energy on the course. 



5. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10)
CoQ10 is an antioxidant that plays a critical role in energy production within cells. It helps improve aerobic power and reduce fatigue.

How to use - Taking 100-200 mg of CoQ10 daily can help boost your energy levels and support overall cardiovascular health. Research indicates that CoQ10 supplementation can improve exercise performance and reduce fatigue.

Our Condors Edge CoQ10 supplement is a proven way to boost your energy on the course. 

 

Final Thoughts 
Incorporating these supplements into your routine can help you maintain energy levels and improve performance during a round of golf. Always consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new supplement regimen to ensure they are appropriate for your individual health needs and conditions.

 

References
1. Glade, M. J. (2010). "Caffeine-Not just a stimulant." Nutrition, 26(10), 932-938.

2. Shimomura, Y., et al. (2006). "Branched-chain amino acid supplementation before squat exercise and delayed-onset muscle soreness." International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 16(6), 620-635.

3. Sawka, M. N., et al. (2007). "Exercise and fluid replacement." American College of Sports Medicine position stand. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 39(2), 377-390.

4. Kreider, R. B., et al. (2017). "International Society of Sports Nutrition position stand: safety and efficacy of creatine supplementation in exercise, sport, and medicine." Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 14(1), 18.

5. Crane, F. L. (2001). "Biochemical functions of coenzyme Q10." Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 20(6), 591-598.